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that are kind of active in your life. so, i hope that this kind of education that will help people who are victims of violence, actually recognize that they are being exploited that they are in violent situations and it will give them the courage to kind of move out of those situation buzz but what i have found is people who are from the working class and are strained and unemployed, don't have the means to leave abusive situations. president chu made sure that more money goes into this and it is long overdue and so if the experience of me, the experience of the level of discourse around the issue of domestic violence has increased this past year, and then, that is a good thing. you know? and i am glad that more money and more attention is being given to this. i hope that in the future we see more women of color associated with this issue, today i don't see any. there are not any here, aliana lopez had a different perspective she was never brought into the conversation as somebody who was part of the conversation should never have bought into the conversation. and so hopefully, that o
else, the other part of that strategy and that goal is to do a much more serious education marketing campaign. we've got to educate everybody using our streets. so, we're choosing today in the middle of the beginning of our holiday season with everybody's attention on having great fun, having wonderful events, having serious sales that allow people to shop, this is where the consciousness has to be risen. and, so, in light of this, we picked this day and this time and this area of year to make this announcement that we have a pedestrian strategy that's going on, a serious one. we're jointly doing it with the collaboration of all the different departments. we have asked and part of the strategy will be our police department, really doing a lot more enforcement strategically in all the areas that we need to, with not only stops, not only enforcement and ticketing, but a serious effort to remind people that these are going to be spots where we are going to pay a lot more attention. we have the mta, with ed's leadership and his staff, parking and traffic and others, working to do some of
long enough to explain the differences as well and to educate on those nuances of renewable energy credit versus bundleeled kilowatt hours and it's complex and i don't know how long they will colerate -- tolerate us on the porch talking but that is a key part and the education component in order to survey them and what they think is an important part of it, so we will be conducting our third city wide customer survey in early january to test this new premium price that we have established and as well as this and the pg&e green tariff option is available to them. we will use the results of the surveys then to redine the roll out of the program. it will help us make sure we anticipate the right number of -- right percentage of opt out across the city, and we will take that heat map i showed you with the green and that survey will modify the specifics of that heat map again because we will have better information once again about customer acceptance of the program and then that wraps up the first quarter and we will have enough information then to come to the public utilities commis
on the san francisco public utilities commission and for the education plans for the choice aggregation and cleanpower sf program. >> okay. very good. colleagues it's a really as president torres as said it's a momentous occasion, historic occasion we had. we improved our relationship with shell and the allocation for the cleanpower sf and we're looking how the power can be maximized in the next year as we in fact the process of enrollment. i've actually believe that the timing of this could not be anymore -- anymore important to do today because of our global climate change that is happening, and i believe that we're seeing -- actually on the way here today i was listening to the radio. there was a report on democracy now that a portion of our artic ice about the size of the united states of america had melted this year which is significant to really alter what the temperature of the ocean is and we're seeing what really the impact of -- every year we're seeing dramatic examples of climate change and hurricane sandy being one of them. we're also seeing around the world real demogr
to our schools is of a ticket to educational success. >> she runs several charter schools all with outstanding test scores. >> you do this with the same money? >> we do it with less between four and $6,000 less per child. john: how did they get them so interested? >> mask? >> reading, writing. john: that is not work the school day is longer they stay until 5:00 p.m. and the chartered teachers could be asked to work more but they told us that they don't mind. you will be burnt out. >> that is not an option because we have our eye on the prize. >> they do -- use new teaching techniques sometimes they wear your pieces and coach. >> what are they telling you? >> the news that i don't see if i don't think of a great question and the moment my principal can feed that to me. >> athletes in the olympics the constant support to be on the top of their game. >> they constantly wave their hands and it confused me but then the students explained it is called active listening instead of interrupting to say can i go to the bathroom or can i a greek they make hand gestures. >> hi eighth test
services to the arab couldn't health and education and immigration his days start in the early mornings, commuting between court appointments homes of low increase and disabled clints, hospitals and schools and his work leads into the late evenings he can be found in the late trip ac's where he tutors nearly 50 america youth to help them understand the important of education their futures in the world and academic excellence his mint doesn't stop at mentoring he helps many student pursue scholarships to per view their dreams for higher education he understand the value and importance of community service and empowering our people to be strong and proud and conscious and capable members of the community who never forgot their heritage. so abraham, on behalf of the city and county of the san francisco x we will like to presented you with the 2012 distinguished service award. (applause). >>> thank you all and i appreciate this very much from the government of san francisco and i thanks our community at large and everyone who is here and for them, i thank them also and we will try our be
't do anything useful just like a newborn is limited in skill, without an education or supporting the paradigm for a i, artificial intelligence, to educate them. >> host: can you elaborate on what the neocortex is as opposed to the brain? >> guest: the old brain and the new brain. the new brain is the neocortex. only mammals have the neocortex. these early mammals emerged over 1 hundred million years ago, the neocortex is the size of a postage stamp and is basically the outer layer, neocortex means new rind, of the brain and capable of thinking in a hierarchical fashion. >> host: that is the part of the brain you are focusing on. >> caller: -- >> guest: it has complexity 2. twenty-nine and change quickly they were able to adapt. that was not so much an advantage because the environment did not change quickly. it is the normal process of biological evolution, changing behavior over thousands of generations. it is good enough for non medallion species until the cretaceous extinction event sixty-five million years ago. we see geological evidence of it everywhere in the world, somethi
and they have been educated in america and we're trying to give them a legal status that doesn't allow am fear of deportation. allows them go to college or go to school and stay here if they want to. if they want to become citizens, they can apply and get in line and abide by the law as it is today. we don't change the law. we don't prohibit them. but we don't give them the cut in line before the people who have it withed for years to get that green card or citizenship. gerri: i want to switch gears here a little bit. you wrote a op-ed, calling on washington, calling on congress and the president not to raise taxes on small business operators. what do you fear and what would you like to see happen? >> i think we're going to just wreck this very fragile economy if we raise taxes on the people who are creating jobs. they want to create jobs. we need to give the people in small business a stability, and a predictability. they need to know what to expect and all the president talks about is more taxes and more taxes and more taxes. and, on top of health care, that's why we have not gotten really a
the state law or on the other hand where is there jeopardy for us? >> so the notification and education program survey and early notification portions are the sort of the new pieces that aren't required by state law. we are using those outreach efforts, those outreach components to inform who we talk to in the actual statutory opt out phase. we are not suggesting that anyone who is going to be served by cleanpower sf would not receive an opt out notification. anyone who wishes to participate can participate which sounds like opting in, but we won't enroll them after we have included them in an opt out process. so i think we have worked with the city attorney on this to make sure we are accurately understanding our obligation and that our approach is consistent with it. we think it is. and so we're not always this careful with our language as we should be, but the actual steps will be anyone who says "let me in" will receive and be included in the opt out portion of the program. >> thank you. >> you're welcome. >> can i add also the people who are seen in the green area that are sa
was not to convert them, but to educate them. and to improve their lives and tangible ways because that's what they responded to positively. once he had the inside, he had what became the greatest university of her release. >> isn't still open? >> it is. it weathered many tech theories, but it remains open and stay that way. >> who owns it, who rents it? >> it is still run by a very impressive faculty of professors and administrators who are middle easterners and american. daniel liss and peter gorman who is a psychologist by training and shared with the important departments at the university of chicago before he took the shot of a couple years ago. >> is it coincidental uses direct consignment was that on purpose? >> he has a personal passion for the school because of his family connections. >> i can come in the american university, or who runs the? >> faculty air missile easterners. the vast majority of students. >> is it associated with religion, another school? >> is deliberately secular nonsectarian. >> what does it cost to go their four-year? >> i have no idea. >> what would it cost and
notification and education plan there, the framework is clear and i think it's a good starting point to move forward for the city and i believe that while we have had comments about talking about caution i think they're well meaning how to have a successful program but i think the success of the program is that we roll out quickly with the notification and the education plan. that's going to be most meaningful. i also want to make sure that we're really clear that the effort is really working in the deep green areas first and foremost where we know a particular target audience is for the message and we know how to craft that message for them as well. i think that is going to be significant. we're not reaching out to every population in san francisco from the get go but the deep green area is where we need to focus the efforts on. this plan incorporates that and i believe it's the right way to go. i would like to move forward approving something today that can later be implemented early next year and hopefully we can move that in that direction. commissioner olague. >> yeah. i just wan
, and for people who are interested in education and children, i was sort of surprised to find him on my door step. excuse me. so i didn't know enough about him to really say "yes" so i decided to ask around about him. l you can imagine the surprise i heard from people. they loved him. he was beloved by everyone that i respected in education and politics, so i decided to call him and meet with him, and on our first meeting we had so much fun that i decided -- who cares? at least i will have fun with this guy. not only did have fun, but he trownsed most of the city that year in voter turnout. since most of my political focus is education and children i'm not someone you should ask to run your campaign lightly. i think henny will tell you that. i will vet you intensely and get in your face, and i will question your beliefs, and i want to make sure you're serious about service in education, and it's funny as milton was he was very serious about service to his city. for some people the call to politics is great. for some it is ego or path to money or power or corruption. some people are call
by a single mom and being proud of my dad imprisoned and now pursuing my education, i would say there is not one answer. the answer is that there is not an answer. you have brought about by bringing this conversation forum. it is not just law enforcement perspective, it is not just the community-based perspective, it is not just the research perspective, it is a multi- layered approach. first and foremost, we do have to consider meeting youth where they are act. we are talking about perpetrators of violence or what not or system involved or involved in gangs, we have to meet them where they are at. pain and hurt produces more hurt, right? what is fundamental it is addressing back pain -- addressing that pain. not looking at folks in a punitive way and saying, this guy is notorious, we have to lock him up. that person is hurting. he might have been abused, you know. first and foremost, we need to meet that individual's needs. i am pursuing a master's in social work. i have that lens. we need to heal our communities and take those answers upon ourselves. everybody has already -- w
not come out there as police officers. we are into education and training. we are not looking to enforce. we tried to instill the idea that the security plan is paramount, providing the framework by which an establishment protect itself from inappropriate behavior and criminal acts for a working relationship with the community and the police. there is that umbrella of security and personnel. we looked at the management to hire the appropriate personnel. hiring, training, and supervision. everything that you need. all of our problems come from the over service of alcohol. we ask for owners to train for over service. we also look for physical security measures, like scanning. additional parking and security of the exterior is important. we think that an ongoing plan management -- constantly as cds nightclub owners assessing management. it is readjusted when necessary. the bottom line is they have a great security plan and they will limit their liability. it is all about making money and defending yourself against liability. that is what we try to preach to club owners and management person
and surgery and he went to the meetings. he was a true believer and wanted to make it a better educational facility. many of his friends who are here and they would agree if you wanted someone in your corner you wanted milton. and there was a question that he had a temper and he did not and we had a bully in our neighborhood that was beating me up and milton made it clear physically that is not going to happen again. i am proud to say my son carries milton as his middle name and there is no one else that could carry that name. sam has many of the characteristics like my better and people to help people and he truly cares. that is the one thing that will always set my brother aside. he truly cared. he did not make it up. it wasn't for politics. it wasn't to make friends. he cared. milton will be remembered for many things. for me he will always be my brother, and amazing father to three wonderful boys and faithful and loving husband to his wife abbey. i love you milton. [applause] >> and it's now time to hear from a colleague and friend in public service, state senator mark leno. [
in indelible inc.. a blueprint for an america of continental red, network transportation, widespread education and industrial might. at the same time these 12 terrible months revealed the dreadful cost of entry into that future. payable in blood and misery on battlefields from shiloh sharpsburg, do you bridge to fredericksburg. most of all though, 1862 was the year lincoln rose to greatness. never since the founding of the country has so much depended on the judgment, the cunning, the timing and the sheer physical endurance of one man. now how lincoln survived and ultimately triumphed through 1862 is a very good story but it takes a whole book to tell. tonight i would like to talk for a few minutes with you about why lincoln poured everything he had into the struggle. why was it so important to him to save the union? why fight a war that cost more american lives than all of our other wars put together? three-quarters of a million people dead and countless more wounded in body and in mind. to understand this story, i must take you back another 50 plus years before 1862, to a winter day in febru
that judgment and now you have to work with that in the best way you can. >> when i did the education outreach to federal judges, that's the biggest questions. generally they want to know can you help me do any better than my best clinical judgment? yeah, we can. we can design tests that can predict and they want to know how good can you get? risk assessments are getting better. they're getting a lot better. i look at risk assessments as i have identified the variables that promote risk so that i can develop treatment strategies to reduce those risks. so if you have somebody that scores very high in psychopathy and has all of the other risk factors that would suggest they're is an 80% chance of reoffending in four or five years, you can develop a tiered or strategic relief plan that would help mitigate those risk factors so that that person can be -- levels of risk can be brought down. that's how we think about risk management. i call it typically risk needs assessment, because once you understand the risks, then you can develop ways of mediating them and whether or not that's a brain differen
's educational about this facility. >> fire fly by artist ned con is an art installation which rises straight from the golden gate avenue sidewalk to the top of the building. >> the fire fly wall will be 5 by 5 polley carbon plates that will move with the wind and show a wave effect in the daytime. when those also swing back and forth and they hit the fulcrum, it will also set up an led light that will cover the fire fly. so, at nighttime people in another part of san francisco can see the side of our building and about 20 feet wide and 10 stories high will be a wall that will flickr on and off like fire flies at nighttime. it will be so energy efficient that if all those lights go on, it will be the equivalent of a 40 watt bulb. and also the new piece of artwork going all the way down the side of the building, which looks like this incredible wind ripples on a pond. and i thought, oh, my god, how incredible, how wonderful. >> inside the building we will have water walls in the main staircase, and the water will be dripping through the side of the wall. you'll be able to hear it, you'll be ab
coming together. and what we do is we work within our community to educate people about issues of humanitarian aid and world need. and as we raise our community's consciousness, we fund and we raise funds to support relief efforts all around the world. our projects focus on, education, hunger, safe drinking water, and disaster relief, and all kinds of different ways of helping people. we have ongoing projects in cambodia, haiti, and south africa and helping out in areas just as the tsunami in south east asia and the earthquake and tsunami in japan and last year, and during hurricane katrina we tributed one mill object pounds of food aid. [ applause ] >> and all of that is coming from the lgbt and friends community. so we work as ambassadors for our community and we help change people's minds and hearts about who we are and what we care about. besides providing humanitarian aid, we try to inspire hope in all of our projects and we have found that hope is really just as important as aid, if not more so. and we have worked with a lot of communities in desperate situations arounded
political education so they can make a good choice. there are other programs like oasis. there are not many opportunities, not everybody could work -- all the work permits required. it also requires a social security number. alternative pathways are a good way to go, such as those internship opportunities. use these venues as an opportunity to have kids reflect and make positive choices by leading them to a path of self- determination. >> it is the mayor's youth employment program. the mayor has made a commitment to employ as many youth as possible. that is something that we hope will help. i want to thank all of our panelists today. give them a round of applause. [applause] >> the way we structured this panel, a short presentation to introduce the topic of neuroscience. then we will go to ask questions of all the different members. [applause] >> thank you very much for that kind introduction, for the invitation. i am a narrow scientists. i studied your -- i am a new row scientist. i study your brain. what neuroscience might have to offer in terms of understanding individuals to buy a diffe
year today to educate about these -- many of our partners year today to educate about these issues. also in terms of board guidance. i want to thank all of you for coming. many of you may have assistance. i know many merchants could not be here. please do it share this information with other merchants in the area. we have virginia from the office of small business. we have roger from the bar association. no carla johnson from the office of disability. -- we have carla johnson from the office of disability. i want to especially it acknowledge my colleague to help us get the resources and brought legal expertise to the table. i do not want to take too much of your time. thank you for coming. >> thank you, supervisor chu. i want to express my admiration for a supervisor chu's commitment to you. so, from our office, what we heard, many small businesses were receiving lawsuits regarding it the ada. tonight we will hear about the legal requirements, what has been in place. any small businesses that nderst informed as far as their obligations for the ada, there are the mechanisms to provi
predicting it would be jam san francisco instead of san francisco you knew that folks were educated because of the great leadership at our mta, our county transportation, all of our transit systems and were at the highest level of educating the visitors and others to use public transportation. it will work for all of us and as we build the housing units we identified in hunter's point and treasure island and welcome more people to our great city and we are growing as a result. we are going to have the greatest subway system that can connect to our bart, to our caltrans, to up and down our muni lines. this central subway will be a great success. it will connect to some of the most densely populated and rapidly developing areas, and it will improve access to all of our vibrant communities, and really is investments like this that will foster loyalty among all of our public transit customers while we reduce carbon emissions, make our city cleaner and cleaner. i'm not the only one that thinks this way. you know i'm among many, many friends today in the audience, on stage and i would like to
with an opportunity to correct their behavior and move on so they can get education and get employment and they can become a productive member of society. and generally the juveniles, again, that we deal with are not any different than the adults we deal with. these are juveniles that often come from homes where supervision of the home is either not there or is very lacking. there's really a significant lack of role model support so there are a lot of problems already. the juveniles that generally come to our attention already bring with themselves. the problem is there's still not enough funding, there is not enough vehicles to provide the services that are necessary, so that is a challenge for us, and unfortunately, often the drug use, drug abuse and those other things do lead to serious crimes when they in fact do become involved in a different part of the process. the other question has to do with back and track. i don't see 1506 impacting negatively on back on track. in fact, the conversations in our office are today around how do we expand the program and back on track is a successful program
require and i would just like to add that over the years as the public has become much more educated and aware of the dangers of second hand smoke we've been getting a lot more calls with tenant complaints about smoking and in particular we've seen a lot of people who have called like i remember we got a call from a mother with a brand new infant, seniors with lots of chronic diseases, people with hiv, people with cancer and heart disease, who had just moved into their apartment and had no idea they were going to be exposed to second hand smoke that was drifting from other units into their apartment and they were totally at a loss of what they could do. this is basically a right to know ordinance. this would inform prospective renters where smoking is allowed so they can make an informed decision and choose to decide on an all terp tiff if they don't want to be exposed to the second hand smoke. and supervisor mar, i think you talked a little bit about the 2006 surgeon general's report. one thick that was in the report, even short term exposure can be dangerous to cardiovascular hea
with an education from stanford to develop an innovative, not-for- profit financial incision that uses market principles to affect systemic change. it operates one of the nation's largest individual development, programs, a leading provider of micro loans in california, and has a robust community real estate finance unit. next, we have the ceo of ne community federal credit union. since 1988, she has been the ceo of northwest community federal credit union. under her watch, the credit union group to over 1600 members. it has become the national model for institutions seeking to provide financial education and banking services to the low- income communities. last but not least, we have our conditional lender represented here by wells fargo. mark cyrus is the senior fda banker for the region -- the senior sba banker. he held businesses choose the best loans for the growing business and focus on a comprehensive understanding of their goals for their business. mark is responsible for helping entrepreneurs with sba loans every step of the way. i would like each of you to speak a little bit about w
. the degree to which the library is a model of educating young people is really remarkable and a lot of that goes to the energy that drive it to be candid the fundraising ability that john brings to this. john, thank you for your work and thank you for the introduction. [applause] i hope all of you will join calista and me in keeping mrs. rage anyone your prayers. she's a remarkable woman who spent a lifetime working for this country. we cherish role while she continues to play a role here in the library. i couldn't come here without mentioning nancy for a minute. governor, it's great to be back with you. we did a lot of things over the years. from you being mayor in san diego, to u.s. senator and leader in a variety of ways. i look to them as great people who represent a willingness to serve their state and country. an important way, and i want to say it's a family engagement out there. thank you both for serving the country. it makes a difference. it's great to be back here. [applause] i didn't know you would be with us. we're thrilled to have you here tonight. we have launched wha
founders were not so foolish as to suppose that freedom can thrive or survive without appropriate education and nourishments of character. they understood this must mean education broadly understood to include not just schools, but all the institutions of civil society that explain freedom and equip citizens with the virtues freedom requires. these virtues includes self- control, modernization. these reinforce the rationality essential to human happiness. notice when madison like the founding father's generally spoke of human nature, he was not speaking as modern progressives do as manage inconstant, something evolving, something constantly formed and reformedly changing social and other historical forces. when people today speak of nature, they generally speak of flora and trees and animals and other things not human. but the founders spoke of nature as a guide to and as a measure of human action. they thought of nature not as something merely to be manipulated for human convenience but rather as a source of norms to be discovered. they understood that natural rights could not be asserted,
to be assigned, but he also wanted to exposes them to a european education into the world of international affairs in the world of diplomacy. and they went to sea with benjamin franklin and benjamin franklin's lavish chÂteau outside paris at the time and john quincy adams went to a french school with benjamin franklin's grandson. within several, he was speaking french folly. he was a gifted child. by the time he was 15 he could speak four languages fought late, had rd studied latin and greek. he was so gifted in foreign languages or when the family friend, francis daniel was appointed ambassador, minister to russia, our first minister to russia, he couldn't speak french at the time french was not the language of international diplomacy. there's always the language spoken in the russian court. francis couldn't speak french. young john quincy could and asked john could he take john quincy adams within two st. petersburg as secretary of litigation is 16 years of age. john quincy adams goes up two st. petersburg and spends the europe they are. in the wintertime, it was too cold to really vent
education in i.t., however, i have deployed some systems when i was working for the industry, and i brought in young, energetic staff to help. we implemented this. it took three months. people knew when they were going to get paid. i think we have a happy contractor community. >> these system improvements have really it increased service to our clients and reduced costs and really improved the bidding environment for our contractors. it's remarkable what she has done. >> been a public service -- being a public servant is a good thing. i love my job. i would never exchange it for anything else in the world. [applause] [applause] >> i am from the department of public works. i have the honor of introducing jocelyn quintos. i will just a real quick, jocelyn works very hard. through her work, a lot of contracts and a lot of work that she does -- she has brought new systems that have saved a lot of tand time and allowed us to give contracts and make payments very fast. please meet jocelyn. [applause] >> first of all, i just want to thank spur and mfac for giving me this honor. i've never really w
is they are not doing what they think it should. john: yes. >> what can schools d or withk we do to educate people to get past their instincts and step back and think of things rationally. >> a brilliant question for us. i think we need to get past the belief that person reason is possible given the human animal we are. the brain is only the organ with which we think we think, there are visit bodies of evidence thatting is they are deeply en grained, connected to survival sorts of u instinks, we can realize that our instincts get us into trouble. we can be rational enough to study where they come from as many of u have written about, use that knowledge of our number els to be -- foybles. when you go out driving you put on a seattle belt, you -- a seat belt, we have a tool of knowing where they come from, we can make it a choice to learn. >> very important to do with education, tell people the answers, there is so much effort made to teach everyone american history, and say what do we learn from it, that is not how people learn, at the end they say, i don't know what to think it would be better to
was educated in a private school in england amongst people who had been trained for sort of banking or the army or business. as i came towards the end of my education, i thought i must find something or i'll never meet any of these people again. [laughter] tavis: [laughter] i have those thoughts at least once a week, but i digress. >> i wanted to be a gypsy. i mean, at that time, i was in the breaks from school. i was traveling with my guitar and singing around the place and just sort of busking, we used to call it. i, in my sort of unreal mind, thought i'd like to be in the circus, in the traveling fun fairs, as we call them. i don't know what you call them. what do you call fairs where there are merry-go-rounds, you have the big wheels and all that? tavis: same thing. >> fun fairs, or in the theater. tavis: right. >> i went and looked at a circus and i looked at the accommodation and i thought, oh, a bit small. i'm not sure i could do with that. i was too middle class, you know. i needed the possibility of perhaps having a mortgage and a house and a marriage and a family. so then i looked at
there and utilize resources such as education systems, our community jobs programs, others that might allow people to go in different direction. the unfortunate and very tragic incident in connecticut in sandy hook elementary school of course heightened everybody's awareness of what violence can really be all about. and as we have been not only responding, reacting to this national tragedy that i think president obama has adequately described as broken all of our hearts, and in every funeral that has taken place, for those 20 innocent children and six innocent adults in the school districts, and school administrators, we obviously have shared in that very tragic event, all of us. it has touched everybody across this country. san francisco is no different. and i have shared that emotional experience with the supervisor and everybody here, in our law enforcement, and in our health department as well. the question for us, then, is what do we do about it? and not only can we share in this tragedy and signal our sympathies to the families as we've done, but we've got to do something more. and this is w
to apologize for. first thought wrong properly filtered was some kind of rehabilitation or education or part of the c.o. or the p.d. or the d.a., helps first thought wrong become next right thing. you can do it. i can teach the incarcerated population what to want because they always get what they wanted. they wanted more, they got more. they got it, they got it. they want someday, they left with none. they wanted her or him, they got that. i can tell them what to want now. pass first thought wrong, what to want. they do the right work, i can show them how to keep it this time. my boy's safe all day. it's not because of me. it's because of efforts like this. [applause] >> as our panelists take the stage and get seated, let me introduce our discussion. earlier this year, california state senator mark leno introduced legislation that would revise the penalty for simple drug possession under the state law, making drug possession laws that punish as a felony would now be punished as a misdemeanor. the new legislation, sb-1506, does not apply to anybody involved in selling or manufacturing drugs.
an education -- [applause] >> i guess the question is of fairness. you shouldn't have two systems, one where based on your race or class you can access treatment and move on with your life and another one where because of law enforcement tactics and focus, you end up caught up in a system where you can never move on. you're permanently trapped and weighed down by having a felony conviction. the reason i call it a war on crumbs is the type of people we see at the hall of justice, i brought with me some props. i brought with me a sweetener packet. this is a gram of sweetener. most of the time this is on the high end of the amount of narcotics we see people in possession of. sometimes people have two or three sweetener packages on them and we call them drug dealers, you know. that's why we call it a war on crumbs because the amounts we are talking about are mine us schedule. -- minnesota us schedule. the fact -- are miniscule. and based on less than a packet of sweetener, to me is outrageous. and to me this is a positive first step, in my opinion, because at least you remove some of the stigma
with literacy. that is a problem with education. there is an inevitable path of increasing sophistication, the amount of information that people can process and the amount of narrative complexity that people can process. it is on an increasing curve. >> i know you are an optimist. >> i am optimistic. look at television in 1968 versus or television is today. look at what the cbs evening newscast from 1974 versus what is happening today. it has become more politicized. the ability to process information has grown. these are issues of education. >> [inaudible] >> right. it is now more obvious. >> there is ongoing battle globally. people are putting out ideas. various ways, hidden or not, and value systems for these arguments. that is going on all the time. every single person involved on whatever level in our industry is putting something out there. obviously, you have to take responsibility for it. you try to work out exactly -- you join in a battle. someone else is saying probably the opposite. you have to get in there and do it. other people will not stop and you have to do battle with th
educated middle class on one camp and the so-called islamists and majority of the illiterate part on the other side. that's not the way we expected after the uprising. we need a charter that unifies people that not talking about controversial issues like role, freedom of expression, freedom of religion, freedom of worship but talk about science, technology, health care, that is what people compare about. we are going through difficult time that the economy is falling apart, standard and poor downgraded us to a d minus. not in the greatest shape. we need to see a way to move forward. but it is difficult time right now. >> ifill: but if these numbers hold, it looks like pretty significant victory for the muslim brotherhood, was this silent majority that was speaking? >> i'm not sure it's a silent majority. you have islamists which is probably like 30% of the country the rest are as you know, one-third of the country is illiterate. they are being told that this is stability. i think they have right to think that way. going through turbulent time for two years, if you tell them this
, the education system, and how a litany of stresses on the family environment is leading to what he calls the "destruction of the american childhood." >> in the united states right now, there are three million children receiving stimulant medications for adhd. >> adhd means? >> attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. and there are about half-a- million kids in this country receiving heavy-duty anti- psychotic medications, medications such as are usually given to adult schizophrenics to regulate their hallucinations. but in this case, children are getting it to control their behavior. so what we have is a massive social experiment of the chemical control of children's behavior, with no idea of the long-term consequences of these heavy-duty anti-psychotics on kids. and i know that canadians statistics just last week showed that within last five years, 43 there's been a 43 percent increase in the rate of dispensing of stimulant prescriptions for add or adhd, and most of these are going to boys. in other words, what we're seeing is an unprecedented burgeoning of the diagnosis. and i should
. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. in the neighbourhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbour? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a la of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighbourhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood! ♪ grr! hi, neighbour! grr! i'm daniel tiger, and this is tigey! grr! we're playing jungle! (chattering) want to play? put on your binoculars like this. ooh! there's my jungle
to hustle for any means to bring a college education within the budget. ben kaplan is an entrepreneur. he's been through the process. he's got a model that really helps families make it. he wrote the book 'how to go to college almost for free,' and he runs the company let's talk scholarships. doesn't every parent hold this dream that there's got to be a scholarship out there for their perfect kid? > > that's right. great to be with you bill. you know, that was the dream actually of my parents not too long ago. i had grown up and played competitive tennis. always assumed i could go to school on a tennis scholarship. i got an injury in my back and needed a different way to pay for school, and i discovered there are corporations, foundations, associations, community groups that all reward different scholarships. and the key is, this isn't just for those with high gpas, this isn't just for amazing athletes. so i personally applied for three dozen scholarships. i won two dozen of them and the accumulated $90,000 in scholarship money. it got me into harvard and paid for
the next year. we plan to have quarterly meetings and have them include educational component to help dwns the mutual knowledge and guide the work and continue to have robust exchanges among ourselves and the key agencies and cal-ema and fema and others providing resources post disaster so thank you. >> thank you very much. that was very informative. thank you. i would like to ask now john boseman to come join me who is the government affairs manager for boma and the mayor mentioned it early ye today. i think john has a one minute film he's going to show and he's also going to be -- as you know in each of the agenda's we ask a community partner to come up and do a brief presentation so we know what they're up to so john i turn it over to you. >> thank you. i appreciate it. happy friday afternoon. it's an honor to be here with so many distinguished city leaders. i am humbled and admiral thank you for your good work. it's an honor to be in the same room. who knows what this is? good. that sames me time. i'm here to talk about the importance of this room and building and the good wo
filling station for years the p uc has worked to educate residents to drink tap water it cost less than half a pen where he per gallon and is quality tested every year and highly regulated bodily the e.p.a. and furthermore the e pc is work to go install -- throughout the city and we are starting to see some major improvements the city has installed 11 water bottle filling stations to date and there are important reasons to promote tap water it's better for the environment is it saves residents money and cuts down on the sugary consumption of beverages as well. and i also want to invite residents that i'm hold be coffee hours on ole gai ass cafe on the outer rich mopped and then my evening hours have a bear with me at steins on clement street and eight avenue near the old colosseum theater and on sat i'll be joining with the justice committee commemorating the 75th anniversary of the terrible tragedy 75 year ago at the chinese cultural center. the rest i'll submit. >> thank you mr. avalos. >> colleague i have one item for intrusion today it's an ordinance that would require the wic
at that for the moment. i'm sorry, did i apologize for being snaky? >> i think for education purposes it would be good to have something on the website that people can easily figure out okay if this happens then i go down this path? >> yes, so it's clear to everyone. >> any additional comments from the commissioners based on public comment? >> i do have one question. he i think the question was raise what is your address happens if we deadlock? the way i'm reading this as drafted if there are not three votes in favor, then the burden has not been met under whatever chapter 2 or 3. so i just wanted to clarify whether that is the intent. so we're not really going to come up with that scenario of a dead loch.e lock. just three favors in favor of whatever chapter we're under. is that the intent? >> yes, it was the intent. >> if there is hypothetically some meeting where it's 2-2, you could form a [pha-eurpt/] to continue the matter until there is a exeter where there is five people. >> okay. so even if there is a single meeting with a deadlock, there are still options for the commission to dispo
russian tobacco education project and many more. i also will be introducing a couple minor amendments that i will mention kind of towards the end, but i wanted to say that we're not going to have a formal presentation but i wanted to thank karen nikovoli and rosalee from breathe california for their great work in crafting this legislation and working with many event coordinators as well. miss labasee and miss shanban are here as well. let's open this up for public comment. i know we have a number of speaks from breathe california and other organizations as well. if you would like to speak, please come forward. is karen nikoboli in the audience? if anyone else would like to speak, please line up on the side of the room if you can. >> good afternoon, my name is ernestine weiss and first of all, eric, i want to congratulate you on this legislation. it is so needed i cannot tell you enough. it is incredible that we have to be exposed to smoke that leads to cancer. you walk along the sidewalk and people puff right into your face. it's awful. you really have to walk with a mask on i
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